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Simon Josefsson: Wifi on S3 with Replicant

11 August, 2014 - 02:02

I’m using Replicant on my main phone. As I’ve written before, I didn’t get Wifi to work. The other day leth in #replicant pointed me towards a CyanogenMod discussion about a similar issue. The fix does indeed work, and allowed me to connect to wifi networks and to setup my phone for Internet sharing. Digging deeper, I found a CM Jira issue about it, and ultimately a code commit. It seems the issue is that more recent S3′s comes with a Murata Wifi chipset that uses MAC addresses not known back in the Android 4.2 (CM-10.1.3 and Replicant-4.2) days. Pulling in the latest fixes for macloader.cpp solves this problem for me, although I still need to load the non-free firmware images that I get from CM-10.1.3. I’ve created a pull request fixing macloader.cpp for Replicant 4.2 if someone else is curious about the details. You have to rebuild your OS with the patch for things to work (if you don’t want to, the workaround using /data/.cid.info works fine), and install some firmware blobs as below.

adb push cm-10.1.3-i9300/system/etc/wifi/bcmdhd_apsta.bin_b1 /system/vendor/firmware/
adb push cm-10.1.3-i9300/system/etc/wifi/bcmdhd_apsta.bin_b2 /system/vendor/firmware/
adb push cm-10.1.3-i9300/system/etc/wifi/bcmdhd_mfg.bin_b0 /system/vendor/firmware/
adb push cm-10.1.3-i9300/system/etc/wifi/bcmdhd_mfg.bin_b1 /system/vendor/firmware/
adb push cm-10.1.3-i9300/system/etc/wifi/bcmdhd_mfg.bin_b2 /system/vendor/firmware/
adb push cm-10.1.3-i9300/system/etc/wifi/bcmdhd_p2p.bin_b0 /system/vendor/firmware/
adb push cm-10.1.3-i9300/system/etc/wifi/bcmdhd_p2p.bin_b1 /system/vendor/firmware/
adb push cm-10.1.3-i9300/system/etc/wifi/bcmdhd_p2p.bin_b2 /system/vendor/firmware/
adb push cm-10.1.3-i9300/system/etc/wifi/bcmdhd_sta.bin_b0 /system/vendor/firmware/
adb push cm-10.1.3-i9300/system/etc/wifi/bcmdhd_sta.bin_b1 /system/vendor/firmware/
adb push cm-10.1.3-i9300/system/etc/wifi/bcmdhd_sta.bin_b2 /system/vendor/firmware/
adb push cm-10.1.3-i9300/system/etc/wifi/nvram_mfg.txt /system/vendor/firmware/
adb push cm-10.1.3-i9300/system/etc/wifi/nvram_mfg.txt_murata /system/vendor/firmware/
adb push cm-10.1.3-i9300/system/etc/wifi/nvram_mfg.txt_murata_b2 /system/vendor/firmware/
adb push cm-10.1.3-i9300/system/etc/wifi/nvram_mfg.txt_semcosh /system/vendor/firmware/
adb push cm-10.1.3-i9300/system/etc/wifi/nvram_net.txt /system/vendor/firmware/
adb push cm-10.1.3-i9300/system/etc/wifi/nvram_net.txt_murata /system/vendor/firmware/
adb push cm-10.1.3-i9300/system/etc/wifi/nvram_net.txt_murata_b2 /system/vendor/firmware/
adb push cm-10.1.3-i9300/system/etc/wifi/nvram_net.txt_semcosh /system/vendor/firmware/

Cyril Brulebois: Why is my package blocked?

11 August, 2014 - 01:45

A bit of history: A while ago udeb-producing packages were getting frozen on a regular fashion, when a d-i release was about to be cut. While I wasn’t looking at the time, I can easily understand the reasons behind that: d-i is built upon many components, it takes some time to make sure it’s basically in shape for a release, and it’s very annoying when a regression sneaks in right before the installation images get built.

I took over d-i release maintenance in May 2012 and only a few uploads happened before the wheezy freeze. I was only discovering the job at the time, and I basically released whatever was in testing then. The freeze began right after that (end of June), so I started double checking things affecting d-i (in addition to or instead of the review performed by other release team members), and unblocking packages when changes seemed safe, or once they were tested.

A few uploads happened after the wheezy release and there’s already a Jessie Alpha 1 release. I was about to release Jessie Beta 1 after some fair bits of testing, a debian-installer upload, and the only remaining bits were: building installation images (hello Steve), and of course communication (mail announce and website update).

Unfortunately a new upstream release reached testing in the meanwhile, breaking the installer in several ways. I’ll give details below, of course not because I want to point finger at the maintainer, but to illustrate the ramifications that a single package’s migrating to testing can induce.

  • parted 3.2-1 was uploaded on 2014-07-30 and migrated on 2014-08-05.

  • parted 3.2-2 fixed a regression reported in Ubuntu only (LP#1352252) which I also hit with images built locally after that migration.

  • I then built some images locally using fixed parted packages but then discovered that auto-lvm was still broken, which I reported in #757417.

  • After some investigation Colin confirmed some behavioral changes in this new parted release, which imply the need for an update of several other partman-* components: #757661, #757662, #757663, #757664, #757665, #757666.

  • Thankfully fixes have been added for all of those (except partman-zfs at the time of writing), but more testing is needed, before possibly urgenting those packages so that they get into testing as soon as possible.

Since I’d like to avoid such experience in the future, I’ll probably reintroduce the old method and freeze all udeb-producing packages during next d-i releases.

So you know why it might happen. Your next question might be: “What to do when your package is getting caught in that net?”. In that case, please get in touch with both debian-release@ and debian-boot@ asking for an unblock. I’ll then review your particular package, and either let it migrate to testing, or delay it until after the release.

Russ Allbery: Orphaning some software packages

10 August, 2014 - 12:23

As mentioned in my previous message, I'm orphaning various software packages that I was maintaining as part of my job at Stanford, or that for some other reason I'm no longer using directly. My goal is to free up some time and space for new work projects at my new employer, for other hobbies, and to take better care of other projects that I'm not orphaning.

The following software packages are now orphaned, and marked as such on their web pages:

I'm also stepping down from Debian package maintenance for the OpenAFS and Shibboleth packages, and have already notified the relevant communities. For the Debian packages, and for the above software packages, I will continue to provide security support until someone else can take them over.

WebAuth is going to be in a state of transition as noted on its page:

My successor at Stanford will be continuing maintenance and development, but that person hasn't been hired yet, and it will take some time for them to ramp up and start making new releases (although there may be at least one interim release with work that I'm finishing now). It's therefore not strictly orphaned, but it's noted that way on my software pages until someone else at Stanford picks it up.

Development of the other packages that I maintain should continue as normal, with a small handful of exceptions. The following packages are currently in limbo, since I'm not sure if I'll have continued use for them:

I'm not very happy with the current design of either kadmin-remctl or wallet, so if I do continue to maintain them (and have time to work on them), I am likely to redesign them considerably.

For all of my packages, I've been adding clones of the repository to GitHub as an additional option besides my personal Git repository server. I'm of two minds about using (and locking myself into) more of the GitHub infrastructure, but repository copies on GitHub felt like it might be useful for anyone who wanted to fork or take over maintenance. I will be adding links to the GitHub repositories to the software packages for things that are in Git.

If you want to take over any of the orphaned software packages, feel free. When you're ready for the current software pages to redirect to its new home, let me know.

Ian Donnelly: How-To: kdb merge

10 August, 2014 - 10:30

Hi Everybody,

As you may know, part of my Google Summer of Code project involved the creation of merge tools for Elektra. The one I am going to focus on today is kdb merge. The kdb tool allows users to access and perform functions on the Elektra Key Database from the command line. We added a new command to this very useful tool, the merge command. This command allows a user to perform a three-way merge of KeySets from the kdb tool.
The command to use this tool is:
kdb merge [options] ourpath theirpath basepath resultpath

The standard naming scheme for a three-way merge consists of ours, theirs, and base. Ours refers to the local copy of a file, theirs refers to a remote copy, and base refers to their common anscestor. This works very similarly for KeySets, especially ones that consist of mounted conffiles. For mounted conffiles, ours should be the user’s copy, theirs would be the maintainers copy, and base would be the conffile as it was during the last package upgrade or during the package install. If you are just trying to merge any two KeySets that derive from the same base, ours and theirs can be interchanged. In kdb merge, ourpath, theirpath, and basepath work just like ours, theirs, and base except each one represents the root of a KeySet. Resultpath is pretty self- explanatory, it is just where you want the result of the merge to be saved under.

As for the options, there are a few basic ones and one option, strategy, that is very important. The basic options are:
-H --help which prints the help text
-i --interactive which attempts the merge in an interactive way
-t --test which tests the propsed merge and informs you about possible conflicts
-v –verbose which runs the merge in verbose mode
-V –version prints info about the version

The other option, strategy is:
s --strategy which is used to specify a strategy to use in case of a conflict

The current list of strategies are:
preserve the merge will fail if a conflict is detected
ours the merge will use our version during a conflict
theirs the merge will use their version during a conflict
base the merge will use the base version during a conflict

If no strategy is specified, the merge will default to the preserve strategy as to not risk making the wrong decision. If any of the other strategies are specified, when a conflcit is detected, merge will use the Key specified by the strategy (ours, theirs, or base) for the resulting Key.

An example of using the kdb merge command:
kdb merge -s ours system/hosts/ours system/hosts/theirs system/hosts/base system/hosts/result

-Ian S. Donnelly

Russell Coker: Being Obviously Wrong About Autism

10 August, 2014 - 00:01

I’m watching a Louis Theroux documentary about Autism (here’s the link to the BBC web site [1]). The main thing that strikes me so far (after watching 7.5 minutes of it) is the bad designed of the DLC-Warren school for Autistic kids in New Jersey [2].

A significant portion of people on the Autism Spectrum have problems with noisy environments, whether most Autistic people have problems with noise depends on what degree of discomfort is considered a problem. But I think it’s most likely to assume that the majority of kids on the Autism Spectrum will behave better in a quiet environment. So any environment that is noisy will cause more difficult behavior in most Autistic kids and the kids who don’t have problems with the noise will have problems with the way the other kids act. Any environment that is more prone to noise pollution than is strictly necessary is hostile to most people on the Autism Spectrum and all groups of Autistic people.

The school that is featured in the start of the documentary is obviously wrong in this regard. For starters I haven’t seen any carpet anywhere. Carpeted floors are slightly more expensive than lino but the cost isn’t significant in terms of the cost of running a special school (such schools are expensive by private-school standards). But carpet makes a significant difference to ambient noise.

Most of the footage from that school included obvious echos even though they had an opportunity to film when there was the least disruption – presumably noise pollution would be a lot worse when a class finished.

It’s not difficult to install carpet in all indoor areas in a school. It’s also not difficult to install rubber floors in all outdoor areas in a school (it seems that most schools are doing this already in play areas for safety reasons). For a small amount of money spent on installing and maintaining noise absorbing floor surfaces the school could achieve better educational results. The next step would be to install noise absorbing ceiling tiles and wallpaper, that might be a little more expensive to install but it would be cheap to maintain.

I think that the hallways in a school for Autistic kids should be as quiet as the lobby of a 5 star hotel. I don’t believe that there is any technical difficulty in achieving that goal, making a school look as good as an expensive hotel would be expensive but giving it the same acoustic properties wouldn’t be difficult or expensive.

How do people even manage to be so wrong about such things? Do they never seek any advice from any adult on the Autism Spectrum about how to run their school? Do they avoid doing any of the most basic Google searches for how to create a good environment for Autistic people? Do they just not care at all and create an environment that looks good to NTs? If they are just trying to impress NTs then why don’t they have enough pride to care that people like me will know how bad they are? These aren’t just rhetorical questions, I’d like to know what’s wrong with those people that makes them do their jobs in such an amazingly bad way.

Related posts:

  1. Autism, Food, etc James Purser wrote “Stop Using Autism to Push Your Own...
  2. Autism and a Child Beauty Contest Fenella Wagener wrote an article for the Herald Sun about...
  3. Autism Awareness and the Free Software Community It’s Autism Awareness Month April is Autism Awareness month, there...

Steve Kemp: Rebooting the CMS

9 August, 2014 - 16:59

I run a cluster for the Debian Administration website, and the code is starting to show its age. Unfortunately the code is not so modern, and has evolved a lot of baggage.

Given the relatively clean separation between the logical components I'm interested in trying something new. In brief the current codebase allows:

  • Posting of articles, blog-entries, and polls.
  • The manipulation of the same.
  • User-account management.

It crossed my mind the other night that it might make sense to break this code down into a number of mini-servers - a server to handle all article-related things, a server to handle all poll-related things, etc.

If we have a JSON endpoint that will allow:

  • GET /article/32
  • POST /article/ [create]
  • GET /articles/offset/number [get the most recent]

Then we could have a very thin shim/server on top of that whihc would present the public API. Of course the internal HTTP overhead might make this unworkable, but it is an interesting approach to the problem, and would allow the backend storage to be migrated in the future without too much difficulty.

At the moment I've coded up two trivial servers, one for getting user-data (to allow login requests to succeed), and one for getting article data.

There is a tiny presentation server written to use those back-end servers and it seems like an approach that might work. Of course deployment might be a pain..

It is still an experiment rather than a plan, but it could work out: http://github.com/skx/snooze/.

Russ Allbery: A new challenge

9 August, 2014 - 12:01

Those reading this journal may have noticed that my rate of posting has dropped a bit in the past few years, and quite a lot in the past year. One of the major reasons for this was work, which had been getting more bureaucratic, more stressful, less trusting, and more fearful. After this got drastically worse in the past six months, I finally decided enough was enough and took advantage of a good opportunity to do something different.

I will be joining Dropbox's site reliability engineering team in a week and a half (which means that I'll be working on their servers, not on the product itself). It will take a few months to settle in, but hopefully this will mean a significant improvement to my stress levels and a lot of interesting projects to work on.

I'm taking advantage of this change to inventory the various things I'm currently committed to and let go of some projects to make more space in my life. There are also a variety of software projects that I was maintaining as part of my job at Stanford, and I will be orphaning many of those packages. I'll make another journal post about that a bit later.

For Debian folks, I am going to be at Debconf, and hope to meet many of you there. (It's going to sort of be my break between jobs.) In the long run, I'm hoping this move will let me increase my Debian involvement.

In the long run, I expect most of my free software work, my reviews, and the various services I run to continue as before, or even improve as my stress drops. But I've been at Stanford for a very long time, so this is quite the leap into the unknown, and it's going to take a while before I'm sure what new pattern my life will fall into.

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